5 things every student must know about Malaysia.

Malaysia is a country in South-East Asia occupying parts of the Malay Peninsula and the island of Borneo. It's known for its beaches, rainforests and mix of Malay, Chinese, Indian and European cultural influences. The capital, Kuala Lumpur, is home to colonial buildings, busy shopping districts such as Bukit Bintang and skyscrapers such as the iconic, 451m-tall Petronas Twin Towers.

The federal constitutional monarchy consists of 13 states and three federal territories, separated by the South China Sea into two similarly sized regions, Peninsular Malaysia and East Malaysia (Malaysian Borneo). Peninsular Malaysia shares a land and maritime border with Thailand in the north and maritime borders with Singapore in the south, Vietnam in the northeast, and Indonesia in the west. East Malaysia shares land and maritime borders with Brunei and Indonesia and a maritime border with the Philippines and Vietnam. Kuala Lumpur is the national capital and largest city while Putrajaya is the seat of federal government. With a population of over 30 million, Malaysia is the world's 44th most populous country.

However, there are 5 things that every student and sponsor needs to know about studying abroad, they have been listed below for your reference.


1. International Student Life.

In Malaysia, There are many Recreational Places you can visit when studying in Malaysia such as the Museum, Highlands, Sports Centres & Stadiums, Shopping, Fruit Resorts, Islands; Langkawi, Tioman, Redang, Perhentian. These are all very nice places to visit during the holliday Season. In Malaysia, many shops food and groccery shops open atleast 18hrs a day although, there are shops like 7Eleven, KK, OK24 that open for 24hrs a day and all days of the year. Some of the International Student hotspots are listed below:

In general, you can spend up to $200(U.S Dollars) a week in expensive cities or $100-$150 a week on average for the majority of the world. Conversely, you can spend between $50-$80 a week in super affordable countries in Southeast Asia like Malaysia, India and China. Note that this does not include housing and travel expenses although, this should just cover eating out, public transportation, and nights out.

Moreover, it's a good idea to have a couple hundred US dollars exchanged from your local currency before you leave for emergencies, and maybe a thousand or two in the bank. This is very, very flexible depending on where you're studying, how long you plan to stay, and how much support you expect to have throughout the duration of your study.

If it's possible, try to ask a local or a student who studied abroad before you, what their expenses were like to get the most recent and accurate idea of what to expect.

2. What's the Coolest Place to Study Abroad?

No Budget

If you have no budget restrictions, my personal favorite would be any country in Europe. There are incredible opportunities for interning with global companies there, and plenty of lifestyle bonuses: they have a fun, laid-back, adventurous culture, there's so much to do, the streets are so nicely organized (go take a look on Google maps, seriously), and the architecture is out of this world and there are tons of monumental structures around IBS Budapest, Hungary.

If you have budget restrictions, I would advise you to try a country in South East Asia like Malaysia, its the world's top 10 Tourist destionation.

Why Study in Malaysia via TS Education Services

On a Budget

If you have budget restrictions, I would advise you to try a country in South East Asia like Malaysia, its the world's top 10 Tourist destionation. I bet you would meet people from all over the world because, the people of malaysia are very honest and the rank top 10 in hospitality too. The best part is their currency is less than US Dollar so, you study and obtain a U.K or U.S.A or Canadian or Australian Degree for a fraction of the total cost, sweet right?.

In the end, the choice is up to you. Just as everyone has a favorite destination in the world, each person will have a different answer for this question. Start by asking friends and family who have studied abroad what they liked (or disliked) about where they studied. That might help you narrow your choices.


3. How do I get started?

To start, You need to make up your mind about where you want to study. You should start to think about choosing a program and also, you have to choose a university that offers the program which you want to study. If you haven't already.

You'll then want to look closely at the courses offered by the institutions on your shortlist, as well as researching the local area and lifestyle, admission requirements and costs.

When you have firmly decided on your program and institution, you should start to think about your application(s). Application processes differ depending on the university and the country.

In some cases, there is a two-step application process for international students. This means you must submit two applications: one for a place at the university and one for a place on the course itself. If you still have questions about the process, you should contact your study abroad agent directly.

If you think you might need a student visa, remember that in most cases you won't be able to apply for one until you have received a letter of acceptance from your chosen university. Each stage can take several months, so allow as much time as possible.

You may simply apply through our Application PAGE and we will guide you throughout the process.

4. How Difficult is it to Pack for Study Abroad?

We know airlines only allow a limited amount of baggage, and this makes new students very nervous about packing.

I know it might seem like you need more stuff because you'll be away for longer, but I'd actually suggest that you:-

   a. Pack about 7-10 days worth of clothes.
   b. Bring 2-3 pairs of shoes, maximum.
   c. Get a backpack or sturdy duffel bag to pack it all in.
   d. Bring a personal bag like a backpack, large enough to use for weekend getaways.
   e. Make sure you have converters, reusable water bottles, and any prescription meds you'll need while abroad.

The key to packing for any trip is to grab everything you've used every day for the last week (which should be a surprisingly small number of things) and a week's worth of clothes (stick with basics, make it stuff you can mix and match).

   f. Bring toiletries for the first few weeks only and plan on restocking once you're settled in.
   g. Make sure you have extra copies of important documents (e.g. your passport and visa). Leave a copy with your parents, and back it up on Google Drive or Dropbox.
   h. If you know you'll have a furnished room/apartment, leave the house items behind. Instead, pack a few photos of friends or one very small mementos of home to personalize your space.

The people who over-complicate packing for long trips end up miserable lugging their lives around with them. The key to packing for any trip is to grab everything you've used every day for the last week (which should be a surprisingly small number of things) and a week's worth of clothes (stick with basics, make it stuff you can mix and match).


5. How Do You Decide Which Country to Study Abroad In?

What most of the student do is directly picking one of the few options that was given by their university. If you have a hard time making choices, it's likely that your school only has partnerships or exchanges with a few programs anyway. Go to your study abroad office (contact us @www.tseduservices.com) some time this week, tell them you'd like to study abroad, and ask them what programs they offer, which are the most popular, and pick from those.

Go to your study abroad office (contact us @www.tseduservices.com) some time this week, tell them you'd like to study abroad, and ask them what programs they offer, which are the most popular, and pick from those.

You will then want to look closely at the courses offered by the institutions on your shortlist, as well as researching the local area and lifestyle, admission requirements and costs. it's likely that your school only has partnerships or exchanges with a few programs anyway. Go to your study abroad office (contact us @www.tseduservices.com) some time this week, tell them you'd like to study abroad, and ask them what programs they offer, which are the most popular, and pick from those.