10 Important Facts about Studying Abroad.

Anyone who has studied abroad can tell you that you'll never have all your questions answered before you go - Sometimes, it's even hard to know what to ask. Thankfully, hundreds of students have already considered this for you. We want to make your study process as easy as possible for you so, We've listed 10 important Facts you need to know about your Study Abroad.

There are 10 Important Facts that every student and sponsor needs to know about studying abroad, they have been listed below for your reference.


1. Cost of studying Abroad.

"How much money should I save for studying abroad?"

In general, you can spend up to $200(U.S Dollars) a week in expensive cities or $100-$150 a week on average for the majority of the world. Conversely, you can spend between $50-$80 a week in super affordable countries in Southeast Asia like Malaysia, India and China. Note that this does not include housing and travel expenses although, this should just cover eating out, public transportation, and nights out.

Moreover, it's a good idea to have a couple hundred US dollars exchanged from your local currency before you leave for emergencies, and maybe a thousand or two in the bank. This is very, very flexible depending on where you're studying, how long you plan to stay, and how much support you expect to have throughout the duration of your study.

If it's possible, try to ask a local or a student who studied abroad before you, what their expenses were like to get the most recent and accurate idea of what to expect.

2. What's the Coolest Place to Study Abroad?

No Budget

If you have no budget restrictions, my personal favorite would be any country in Europe. There are incredible opportunities for interning with global companies there, and plenty of lifestyle bonuses: they have a fun, laid-back, adventurous culture, there's so much to do, the streets are so nicely organized (go take a look on Google maps, seriously), and the architecture is out of this world and there are tons of monumental structures around IBS Budapest, Hungary.

If you have budget restrictions, I would advise you to try a country in South East Asia like Malaysia, its the world's top 10 Tourist destionation.

On a Budget

If you have budget restrictions, I would advise you to try a country in South East Asia like Malaysia, its the world's top 10 Tourist destionation. I bet you would meet people from all over the world because, the people of malaysia are very honest and the rank top 10 in hospitality too. The best part is their currency is less than US Dollar so, you study and obtain a U.K or U.S.A or Canadian or Australian Degree for a fraction of the total cost, sweet right?.

In the end, the choice is up to you. Just as everyone has a favorite destination in the world, each person will have a different answer for this question. Start by asking friends and family who have studied abroad what they liked (or disliked) about where they studied. That might help you narrow your choices.


3. How do I get started?

To start, You need to make up your mind about where you want to study. You should start to think about choosing a program and also, you have to choose a university that offers the program which you want to study. If you haven't already.

You'll then want to look closely at the courses offered by the institutions on your shortlist, as well as researching the local area and lifestyle, admission requirements and costs.

When you have firmly decided on your program and institution, you should start to think about your application(s). Application processes differ depending on the university and the country.

In some cases, there is a two-step application process for international students. This means you must submit two applications: one for a place at the university and one for a place on the course itself. If you still have questions about the process, you should contact your study abroad agent directly.

If you think you might need a student visa, remember that in most cases you won't be able to apply for one until you have received a letter of acceptance from your chosen university. Each stage can take several months, so allow as much time as possible.

You may simply apply through our Application PAGE and we will guide you throughout the process.


4. How Difficult is it to Pack for Study Abroad?

We know airlines only allow a limited amount of baggage, and this makes new students very nervous about packing.

I know it might seem like you need more stuff because you'll be away for longer, but I'd actually suggest that you:-

   a. Pack about 7-10 days worth of clothes.
   b. Bring 2-3 pairs of shoes, maximum.
   c. Get a backpack or sturdy duffel bag to pack it all in.
   d. Bring a personal bag like a backpack, large enough to use for weekend getaways.
   e. Make sure you have converters, reusable water bottles, and any prescription meds you'll need while abroad.
   f. Bring toiletries for the first few weeks only and plan on restocking once you're settled in.
   g. Make sure you have extra copies of important documents (e.g. your passport and visa). Leave a copy with your parents, and back it up on Google Drive or Dropbox.
   h. If you know you'll have a furnished room/apartment, leave the house items behind. Instead, pack a few photos of friends or one very small mementos of home to personalize your space.

The people who over-complicate packing for long trips end up miserable lugging their lives around with them. They key to packing for any trip is to grab everything you've used every day for the last week (which should be a surprisingly small number of things) and a week's worth of clothes (stick with basics, make it stuff you can mix and match).


5. How Do You Decide Which Country to Study Abroad In?

What most of the student do is directly picking one of the few options that was given by their university. If you have a hard time making choices, it's likely that your school only has partnerships or exchanges with a few programs anyway. Go to your study abroad office (contact us @www.tseduservices.com) some time this week, tell them you'd like to study abroad, and ask them what programs they offer, which are the most popular, and pick from those.

You will then want to look closely at the courses offered by the institutions on your shortlist, as well as researching the local area and lifestyle, admission requirements and costs.

Graduates who studied abroad via TS Education Services


6. Will Studying Abroad Slow Me Down on the Road to Graduation?

In many cases studying abroad won't slow you down. In some it will actually speed you up. For example, I got full credit for all my classes during both of my summer semesters overseas, and by doing so, I graduated a full year early. I actually got to fly back from Hong Kong, a year after graduating to see the rest of my friends from freshman year who, just graduated back at my home campus!

Moreover, even if your trip abroad makes your road to graduation slower, it will do so in the most meaningful way possible, and it will give you valuable job and life skills along the way. You'll end up better paid, more experienced, and more skilled than your peers thanks to travel, so it'll all be worth it in the end.


7. How Easy are Study Abroad Courses?

The difficulty of your courses while studying abroad really depends heavily on which program you study abroad with.

The idea with study abroad is to balance school and travel in a way that opens your eyes to other cultures. A good amount of your program should feature exploring and experiencing the local culture, cuisine, and art, and hopefully that's a little more light-weight than your usual coursework.

That doesn't mean it won't be hard work, especially trying to balance adventures with friends and homework. Always try to keep in mind what the important parts of your life are. Grades always feel incredibly urgent and important in the moment, but you won't look back on your grades, you'll look back on adventures with friends. So make sure you leave time for both.

Whatever you do, don't worry so much about school work that you forget to take advantage of the fact that you're traveling. Get out, make new friends, explore, and experience. That's what you're doing this for in the first place.


8. What are the Qualifications to Study Abroad? (GPA, etc.)

Anyone can study abroad! Unless your school specifically makes rules dictating who can and can't study abroad (for example, some schools don't allow freshman to study abroad because they require them to live on campus), the only qualifications are those you set for yourself. Some examples of self-imposed qualifications are cost, academic rigor, and opportunities to travel.

Cost will be determined by how much support you want. If you want your hand held every step of the way, from getting housing set up to having meals and trips planned and paid for, you can pay a ton to have that all done for you! Or you can study abroad quite cheaply (you may even save money compared to studying in the Budapest) if you choose to organize it all yourself. Most students opt for something in between, like an exchange or a faculty-lead program.


9. What Subjects Can You Study While Abroad?

You can study any subject you can imagine while you study abroad.

Why?

The reason is because, students all over the world study the same variety of things you do in your home country, so that means you can go to any of their universities and study whatever program you happen to be in here at home while you're overseas!

Try to find an exchange program or a program provider that offers a program specifically for your major, or get adventurous and study abroad while taking all electives outside of your field of expertise. Either it is a wonderful way to expand your mind and expose yourself to experiences you wouldn't have during your typical course of study here at home.


10. What is the Cheapest Way to Study Abroad?

The cheapest way to study abroad is simple: do the research and coordination yourself (with the help of your study abroad office - like TS Education Services, registrar, and financial aid office). It’s hard work, but the main cost (and main benefit) of program providers is in the assistance and advising the provide you along the way.

You will then want to look closely at the courses offered by the institutions on your shortlist, as well as researching the local area and lifestyle, admission requirements and costs.

Study abroad somewhere that the cost of living is much lower like Malaysia. By doing this you might even save enough money to make up for the cost of your plane ticket.

If you think you might need a student visa, remember that in most cases you won't be able to apply for one until you have received a letter of acceptance from your chosen university. Each stage can take several months, so allow as much time as possible. Remember, you can always find out more by contacting TS Education Services.